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THINGS I CAN'T SAY OUT LOUD

March 10, 2019 2 Comments

THINGS I CAN'T SAY OUT LOUD

Throughout diagnosis, surgery, treatment and healing, there are so many things we feel like we can’t or shouldn’t talk about. Too often, we are left feeling shy, scared or too guilty to open up about what we are feeling or experiencing.  We are here to break the silence.  

In honor of our monthly focus on recovery, we started the conversation on Instagram and encouraged our community to share something they’ve been afraid, uncomfortable or guilty to say out loud. Many of you strongly and bravely shared with us, and we’ve rounded them up so you can get inspired and learn from others just like you who are going through it too. By sharing what we’re feeling, we can help us all feel just a bit better by knowing we’re not alone.

THINGS I CAN'T SAY OUT LOUD

STOP THAT 

 

I'M SCARED

 

I SHOULD FEEL LUCKY

"That I feel like I lost my 20 something's. I haven't explored, I didn't climb the ladder or have a steady career. I didn't make choices just for me. The reason I felt I couldn't say these things ... I didn't have cancer. But I lived it taking care of my Mom, making sacrifices due to it and then as soon as I felt like I could take off, BRCA. And now we're back to things I don't always feel I can say. Because I should feel 'lucky.'" 

 

 

 

 

 

 For me, every morning, I wake up, and dying is the first thing I think about. It is dark and scary. I share this with you as well, even though it’s hard for me, to remind you that you are not alone in what you are feeling or facing. Whether you’re newly diagnosed, about to have or recovering from a mastectomy, reconstruction or other breast surgeries, radiation, and more, we are here for you every step of the way.

GO ON, SHARE WITH US!

If you have something you’ve been holding onto, share it with us if you’d like. Send an email, write a comment or join the conversation with us on Instagram or Facebook. We’re always here for you, to listen, to learn, to lift you up, and help you remember that you are NEVER ALONE.

xo,

DANA





2 Responses

Rosie Dennis
Rosie Dennis

March 20, 2019

When I don’t feel like being a cancer patient! I don’t always want to smile and say I’m doing great, I feel wonderful, I’m SOOO lucky! Sometimes I want to be quiet, I don’t want to explain why I’m here in the cancer center. Sometimes I want to tell people NOT to talk to me in consolatory hushed tones. I’m ALIVE and sometimes I’m a introverted brioche!!

Grace Anne
Grace Anne

March 12, 2019

When people ask me how I’m doing, I’m tired of feeling that I have to say “really well” because that is what they want to hear. They don’t want to hear exhausted, sick, afraid I’ll never find a new normal, etc. I find it’s really hard for me to keep hearing “You’re a strong woman, you’ll get through this” when I don’t feel strong at all.

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