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How Do I Manage My Surgical Drains After My Mastectomy?

September 11, 2019

How Do I Manage My Surgical Drains After My Mastectomy?

We can all agree that surgical drains are the absolute worst. They’re uncomfortable, restricting and a little gross. On top of all that, you can’t always shower with them in, so they infringe on your access to hygiene as well. Ugh! Healing from a mastectomy is tough enough, and drains certainly don’t make it any easier. 

Because we hate drains so much, and wanted to make the lives of everyone going through a mastectomy as easy as possible, we designed the Miena Robe with a game-changing feature: The Drain Belt. Read along and learn how this one revolutionary design feature will change the way you heal from your mastectomy. But first, let’s start with the basics…


How Do Mastectomy Drains Work?

During your mastectomy surgery, it is likely that your surgeon will place drains in your breast area to prevent fluid build up and to speed up your body’s healing time. Without these drains in place, fluid could accumulate in the breast or lymph area causing pressure and pain. Without drains in place, there is also the possibility of seroma (aka clear fluid collection) developing. According to Very Well Health, “seromas can delay wound healing and result in infection and a poor cosmetic outcome.” 

The number of drains you have will depend on the kind of breast surgery you are undergoing. Your average mastectomy (with or without reconstruction) will typically come equipped with 2 drains. Depending on your body type and surgery decision, you may have 4 to 6 drains upon the removal of the breast tissue, so always ask your doctor how best to prepare for your recovery.

“This robe is the best. It's the only garment that feels good on my tender arms especially post-mastectomy. So grateful for the perfect construction and fabric.” - An anonymous admirer of The Miena Robe + Drain Belt 

What Do Mastectomy Drains Look Like?

When imagining surgical drains, think about a long clear plastic tube with a bulb attached to the very end. Worried about your drains coming out? Don’t be. A suture will hold the tubes and secure them in place. During surgery the drains placed inside your body will collect the fluid which then makes its way to the bulb where it will be emptied. Need help managing your fluid output? Download our drain tracking guide, jot down your fluid measurements, and take with you to your post-surgery follow-up appointment. 

“I purchased this robe to wear after my double mastectomy...best purchase ever!! So soft and comfy and the drain belt was definitely a help.” - Ann S. 

How Do I Manage My Surgical Drains?

We know how uncomfortable and annoying drains can be. That’s why we designed this important mastectomy recovery clothing, The Miena Robe with Drain Management. 

Both functional and luxurious, this amazing loungewear combo helps make life a little easier while you heal from your mastectomy. Thoughtfully designed with you and your unique medical needs in mind, the Miena Robe with Drain Management can be worn post-surgery, and beyond. Just unsnap the drain belt from inside the robe and enjoy during your treatment, through recovery and beyond.

Miena is the ultimate soft lounge robe perfect for all of your post-surgical needs and beyond. 

Made of silky soft, modal fabric, this robe is as lightweight and breathable as it is comfortable. The luxe material won't irritate areas that are still healing. Instead, it will soothe your sensitive skin while making you feel like a cozy queen! Designed with two detachable pouches, the Drain Management Belt allows you an easy, discreet place to keep your drains. You’ll be comfortable and look polished, while your drains stay in place and are kept fabulously out of the way while you heal. Having a surgery that requires more than just two pouches? We’ve got you covered. We sell additional drain belts separately, so you can get as many as you need! 

Who said post-mastectomy robes can only be worn after surgery? After you’re all healed and your drains are finally removed, you can remove the belt and wear the robe as is! Just like all of our post-mastectomy recovery bras, this robe was designed to support you through every step of your journey as you heal.





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